8 DONT’S When trying to get your work into an art gallery!

This list was given to me by a successful gallery owner:

1)  Don’t show up at the gallery expecting to show your work or meet with the gallery owner without making an appointment first.
2)  Don’t submit your work to a gallery that is not appropriate for your work.  Do your research!
3)  Don’t argue with the gallery owner’s decision, especially when it is “no.”  These are often very difficult decisions to make, but given the volume of artists that submit they are necessary.
4)  Don’t just send a mass submission email out to galleries with a link to your website, facebook or flicker page.  Take the time to approach each one individually for their submission guidelines.
5)  Don’t submit your work to a gallery that is too close in proximity to a gallery that already shows your work (unless the work is drastically different).  You don’t want to oversaturate an area with your work.
6)  Don’t oversubmit and inundate the gallery with too many examples of your work.  Be specific and concise with the number of pieces that you submit as examples.
7)  Don’t be sloppy.  Proof your submission for typos, image quality, image size, etc.
8)  Don’t hassle the gallery with emails or phone calls regarding your submission.  Be patient.  Many galleries have specific times of the year that they review submissions.  Wait for an acknowledgment or communication from them.
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About destructivetesting

I'm a self-taught artist who prefers to use found objects in ways that were never intended. I'm not interested in making 10 or 100 of the same object. This, of course, takes more time to make each piece. I also prefer a more minimalist look, where each part of a piece can be appreciated. I consider my clocks to be small sculptures with moving parts. And, my lamps to be small sculptures with light. My mirrors are reflective sculptures. DESTRUCTIVE TESTING means to push something to it's limits to understand it's structural performance or material behavior under different stresses. I interpret this in my artwork as using materials in different ways or combinations than they were designed to be used. I also just like the slightly ominous sound of the term...
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